Why Serverless Won’t Replace Traditional Servers

By Chris Parlette

bsdrouin / Pixabay

Curious why serverless is so popular – and why it won’t replace traditional servers in the cloud?

In the current cloud infrastructure, top service providers are dedicating a great deal of effort to expand on this architecture as a new approach to a cloud solution that focuses on applications rather than infrastructure. Today we’ll take a look at what serverless computing is good for, and what it can’t replace.

Understanding Serverless

For starters, serverless mostly refers to an application or API that depends on third-party, cloud-hosted applications and services, to manage server-side logic and state, propagating code hosted on Function as a Service (FaaS) platforms.

Even though the name “serverless” suggests that there are no servers involved, there will always be servers in use. Rather, it makes it so developers don’t have to deal directly with the servers – it is more about the implementation and management of them. To power serverless workloads, cloud providers use automated systems that eliminate the need for server administrators, offering developers a way to manage applications and services without having to handle, tweak or scale the actual server infrastructure.

Top Serverless Providers

It is no surprise the top cloud providers that are investing in a major way on serverless include AWS, Microsoft Azure, and Google Cloud. In brief, here is how they approach serverless computing.

AWS Lambda is the current leader among serverless compute implementations. Lambda handles everything by automatically scaling your application by running your code as it’s triggered.

Microsoft Azure Functions enables you to run code-on-demand without having to explicitly provision or manage infrastructure.

Google Cloud Functions is a compute solution for creating event-driven applications and connects with GCP services by listening for and responding to events without needing to provision or manage servers.

Advantages and When to Use Serverless

Let’s look at why serverless is often a good choice. It allows organizations to reduce operational complications associated with infrastructure and related cost expenditures since they are computed for the actual usage or work the serverless platform performs.

When it comes to implementing, maintaining, debugging, monitoring the infrastructure, and setting up your environment, with serverless the heavy lifting is done for you. It allows developers to focus on application development, and not complex infrastructures, thus promoting team efficiency, better serving the customers and focusing on business goals.

Since serverless cost models are based on execution only, using serverless will reduce your costs of operations and save you money on cloud spend, making it more adaptable for short-term tasks on your environment, however, there are hidden costs to be aware of. Though we are considering advantages, this might as well be a disadvantage. Serverless apps rely on API calls, and the heavy use of API request can become very pricey indeed. In addition, networking costs can get very expensive when sending a lot of data and are generally more difficult to track in serverless costs models.

Some of the best use cases for serverless are:

  • Brand new applications that don’t already have an existing workload
  • Microservices-based architectures, with small chunks of code working together
  • Infrequently-used …read more

    Read more here:: B2CMarketingInsider

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